What value does new wine have when older wines appeal more in terms of texture, taste and sometimes price? Today, many drink only fresh youthful fruit flavours yet admit they enjoy mellow and savoury flavours.

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Australian Wine Vintages

Tasting and Travelling | Drinking and Dining | Collecting and Cellaring

July 2013
 

Why is it that many old wines sell for less money than current release?

What value does new wine have when older wines appeal more in terms of texture, taste and sometimes price?  Today, many drink only fresh youthful fruit flavours yet admit they enjoy mellow and savoury flavours.

The most common question I have been asked this winter by serious middle aged wine drinkers is, “Why don’t older vintages of wines with big reputations conform to the law of supply and demand and go up in price?”

Those posing the question assume a market disconnect when wine is improving in “quality” reducing in availability yet selling for less than its release price. The fact is, according Eamonn Egan of Artisan Global 3PL Beverage Logistics, that prices of finite production genuine single vineyard wines like Mount Mary, Giaconda, and Bass Phillip do go up.

In many cases wines do not have sufficient reputation, nor is the market participation deep enough, to create sufficient demand, hence prices stay low creating the anomaly of current releases selling for more than older vintages.

Outside a small core of loyal wine drinkers and hobbyists with cellars, the appreciation of “old wine” is also  limited by available household space to cellar wine.

Additionally until recently, it has been difficult to find reliable quantities of old vintages until Langtons/Dan Murphy’s and bespoke  storage businesses like Artisan Global 3PL Beverage Logistics made them more accessible.

 

 

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